MFF: Dorothy the Rainbow Fairy by Integrated

Dorothy the Rainbow Fairy by Integrated is a great science storybook.

Like most good digital storybooks, you can read the story yourself or let the book read it for you. It also has the typical interactive touch elements on all pages.

But it also has items I have not seen in other story books. Some of those interactive elements are modeled after pop-up or slider books. In most pages you can slide a virtual tab, or spin a virtual wheel.

The book is about fairies and rainbows. And if the book is correct, I might have learned a few things I didn’t know about the origins of rainbows. Overall a high quality and beautiful digital book.

Available in the Android App for Kindle, Google Play and the Apple App store. I received a free iOS version from the publisher. It works offline, and I didn’t see any in-app store.

Mega LopArt by LopLop inc.

Mega LopArt by LopLap is a drawing tool where all the objects you draw can be animated. For example you can change the object by shrinking and growing, spinning, squeezing and expanding and/or fading and unfading.

The app has the usual tools that you expect from a drawing tool. An easy to use color palate, a tool selection bar, ability to share your creations.

Overall not a bad app, but I do have one gripe. I wish the app had some non-abstract drawing tools. They do have another app that does (LopArt Life) and that for the targeted age group (6+) this would not be a problem. The app should spur hours and hours of creativity. I actually bought an extra copy (the copy for the review was provided for free) for my personal iPad. I would also want to mention that on the iPad 2 that I used for testing, the app did crash a couple of times during testing. Hopefully that could be ironed out in the next version.

The app is available in the Apple App Store. I reviewed it on a iPad. No Android version exits.

MarcoPolo Ocean by MarcoPolo Learning, Inc.

Marco Polo Ocean by MarcoPolo Learning is an under water exploring app. The app is extremely well thought out and opened ended.

The first scene allows you to explore the ocean by both adjusting how far or close to the coast you are as well as how deep you are. Not only does the fauna and flora change by moving around in this scene but also the slide out menus change. There are also multiple interactive elements if you touch around.

Two menus are visible. One displays either the vehicle used to explore a particular ecosystem or the ecosystem. I selected only one, and it brought me to a scene where I had to fit in all the missing spaces (like a puzzle).

The other menu shows you living organism of the particular region you are now in. You can drag these organism out and add them to the world. You can also feed them.

The illustrations, animations, and the sound effects are all great. A very good app if your kids are learning about the diverse life that lives in the ocean, or you just want to expose them to a high quality entertaining and educational game.

The app is available in the Apple App Store. I couldn’t find an Android version. It is now on sale for 33% off (depending on the country). I received a free copy provided by the publisher.

eMotion Stories by GO UFO Ltd

eMotion Stories by GO UFO Ltd is a collection of interactive stories for deaf and hard of hearing children. The app and the first story are free. The app features an in-app store to buy other stories.

The stories are beautiful illustrated. As with most interactive books, the words are highlighted as they are read. Unlike all the story books that we have reviewed, in the lower left hand corner the words are signed by a real human ASL narrator. Some words in the story are under-lined. Clicking on these words makes the narrator show you how to sign those particular words. Like many brilliant concepts that look easy and obvious, I wonder why I didn’t come up with this idea first. You can even switch the words of the story to ASL gloss. The app also has a word dictionary where you can select words to be signed.

Overall a great concept and a great app. I believe 3 stories are currently available. And I hope that the app gets the recognition and sales it needs to continue to keep adding stories to the app shelves.

I reviewed the app and the free book on my iPad as prompted by the publisher. It is available in the Apple App Store. I couldn’t find an Android version.

Skeleton Dance by Busy Brain Media

Skeleton Dance by Busy Brain Media is a science app. The app has beautiful clay-animation, introduces children to anatomy, a puzzle game (placing the bones on the empty skeleton shape), and an activity where you can get more information about each bone.

So now lets go on a related tangent: at Smart Kids’ Apps the difference between an app 4.0, 4.5 or 5 is mostly subjective. Yes we have written rules where an app will get automatic deductions based on what use to be common annoyances, but most apps we review don’t have those problems. When we started Smart Kids’ Apps we hardly got any review requests, so we use to review most of what we got. Currently we have over 200+ apps waiting to be reviewed. We get dozens review request a day, and we only review the ones we consider the best. So if you get reviewed on these pages then you are a fairly good app, and in good company.

I didn’t find anything wrong with Skeleton Dance. It is a great app to supplement a learning unit on bones. The illustrations, animations and the activities are all great. The problem is that I compared it with one of most magical apps this reviewer has ever come across. When the e-mail to review this app came in from the same publisher, I expected magic (Lady Bug Number Count). What I got instead was a solid app.

I reviewed it on my iPad. No Android version exits. No ads, works offline and it is a great addition to an education unit about bones.

Shiny Circus by Shiny Things

Shiny Circus by Shiny Things is an educational math app geared to children 2 to 5 years of age. It consists of a story about the circus and a set of math concept activities. The story part of the app is typical of a good interactive story book. The words of the story are highlighted as it is read and each page has interactive elements.

Although the story part of the app is extremely well executed, the math concept activities are extremely impressive. My daughter of 5 year old (apparently the top of the range) had a great time dressing the clowns, balancing the weights, and arranging the stairs. The only activity she didn’t like was the Angry Bird style game: she found the voice coaching too repetitive. What is really impressive is that she had no idea that she was learning new math concepts. Some of the concepts and activities are too advance for the lower age children, be ready to help them.

Overall the music, illustrations, the narrating voice (human) and the animations are all very well done. One of the best apps reviewed this year, and easily worth the price. If we had a sixth star, this app would get it.

I received the app for free from the publisher, and reviewed it on my iPad. The app is available in the Apple App Store, and I couldn’t find an Android version.

TapThePic by Oleg Fedorov

TapThePic by Oleg Fedorov is a straight forward app targeted at very young children. The concept of the app is to show pictures of items or people and have the child touch them. When the child touches the picture it zooms and the app makes a sound.

The free version of the app comes with one set of pictures, but you can buy other sets on the in-app store. Both the settings for the app and the in-app store are only visible when you sequentially click on the four corners of the screen. You can also make your own sets. I could imagine making a set with pictures and sounds from other member of the family. Image one where when your child clicks on your picture you tell him/her you love him, and clicks on the dog and the dog barks. Unfortunately all my children are past the age where this app would be entertaining.

Overall a great concept well executed for an age group that doesn’t get that much attention. The free version was recently updated to include more pictures and backgrounds.

I tested the free version as prompted by the publisher. It is available in the Apple App Store. Works offline, and does have an in app store to buy other picture packs but it would be impossible for the targeted age range to accidentally find it.

Quick Math+ by Shiny Things

I know Quick Math+ by Shiny Things is supposed to be a math drill app, and as such it is great. Select the particular drill, watch the short introduction and then run through the math drill. All the drills are timed, the app keeps a record of your past runs, the app supports multiple students, and the drills are fun to play.

And the fun to play is key. As mostly a casual game player and a math enthusiast, I was instantly addicted to the math drills. I kept repeating to myself one more game over and over. I always wonder why not many casual math games exist, and this one could easily fit that category.

Alas, this blog is about education games. As such Quick Math+ is a great app. Clean graphics, beautiful to understand instructions, challenging and addictive game play, I didn’t find anything that I disliked.

This app was provided for free by the publisher, and I reviewed it on my iPad. It is available on the Apple App Store. I couldn’t find an Android version. The apps works offline. It does have an in-app store that promotes the publisher’s other apps.

Gombby Channel by Magnistage

I played this app with my 5-year-old daughter. Here at Smart Kids’ App we are always behind with reviews: too many ask for reviews, and not a lot of time to do them in.

My plan was to do a few today, and schedule them to be published through the week. Unfortunately that will probably not occur. You see my 5-year-old saw me launch this app, and after asking me a few times how to play it, she has now seen all three fee episode. I am probably on the hook for some of the paid ones.

Gombby Channel is not a game, but rather an app where you can watch the Gombby an animated cartoon series. As stated before the first three episodes are free, after that you are forced to buy more episode if your child wants to continue to watch.

The episodes are beautifully animated and illustrated. The music is beautiful. The colors vibrant. Overall they are of very high quality. The stories (the 2 I have seen at this point) are gentile and appropriate to the age that they are targeted for. The stories usually have educational arcs that are explained through the episode.

Overall I really like the app and Gombby. And by the looks of it, so does my 5-year-old daughter. Available in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store. I reviewed the Apple version on my iPad.

I received a press release from the publisher suggesting I review this app.

Teach Me Apps: English for Kids by Bee Digital

Teach Me Apps: English for Kids by Bee Digital is an iPad app with 12 distinct activities. The include site works, vocabulary and spelling activities. All the activities are well thought out. For example the Alphabet activity has a particular object for each letter, but if you play that activity over or even go back to a previous letter the object is different. I also loved the voice is human and clear. The illustrations are beautiful, and the music is varied and not annoying.

Teach Me Apps: English for Kids is a great app for native speaking little children and for anybody learning English as a second language. I couldn’t find anything that I disliked about the app. Even the background is one of the cutest backgrounds I have seen in a while (kids drawings). The app has no ads, no in app purchases and the external links are protected behind a parent log in. I reviewed the full version as provided by the publisher, but a free version exists.